nest

life. simply.

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I've been fruitlessly staring at the screen all day and latching on to any distraction I could muster. "Why yes, I believe I do need to rearrange all the plates, glasses, pots and pans in the kitchen right this very minute." "Better make sure all the washing is still on the line." (Where did I think it would have gone to...?). I was this close to cleaning the windows when I remembered that I hate cleaning the windows. So instead of any of the five or six posts I wanted to write today here is another life.simply. A few images from around the cottage, unedited, un-styled, just life exactly as it is. The garden coming back to life, a nosy neighbour, a pair of kangaroos boxing in the morning fog (I kid you not) and a discarded chew toy (I have no idea where it came from - we don't own a dog).

How is life where you are at the moment?

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grow

Fiddle Leaf Fig

Species LyrataGenus FicusFamily Moraceae

Fiddle leaf fig trees (ficus lyrata) are native to Western Africa and grow in perpetually wet tropical forest ecoregions. They are can be found in tropical and subtropical gardens but can also thrive as houseplants in more temperate regions, though generally remain smaller in stature and do not produce any fruit.

The fiddle leaf fig was THE plant of 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013. Wow! That is an impressively long-running trend for a house plant though I think we can all agree that the succulent will be taking top honours in 2014. True to form, I purchased my very own fiddle leaf fig two months ago. I had been searching for one since 2012 but the only ones I could find locally were about $200. What!? No way, José! Then, two months ago, I popped into a garden centre with my mother where I promptly and literally tripped over a display of dwarf fiddle leaf figs. It was a sign! The sign said "Dwarf Ficus Lyrata, $25" so I followed that sign right to the cash register and nursed my new little friend all the way home. Fast forward to today and my sweet little plant is a bit under the weather.

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Symptoms include leaf discolouration, dryness and spotting. Poor baby :( I water her once a week (when I remember...) and recently noticed her leaves looking a little dry so relocated her from the dining room to the kitchen. I've tried watering less which didn't help so yesterday I popped her under a lukewarm shower for a good soak then let her dry off in the tub. If there are no signs of improvement after one week I'll try something else. Repotting might work (something I need to do anyway) or I could try an organic fungicide in case of disease.

I'm sure you're as worried as I am so I'll be sure to let you know how Fantine gets on. What? You don't name your house plants? I'm starting to think that I should have chosen a namesake with a happier end. Did someone say self-fulfilling prophecy?

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